Power up your hearing with the amazingly smart Baha 5 Power!

Baha-5-Power

Baha user Dennis Klatte 65, lost his hearing at the age of 60 due to an acoustic neuroma. The removal of the tumour left him completely deaf on the right side.

“I rather foolishly asked, ‘Is there a chance that the nerve will grow back?’ and after they were done laughing, they said no,” Dennis recalls with a wry smile. “So the option was the Baha solution. When the ENT doctor put the little Baha sound processor on a headband and held it against my head – it was amazing, I could hear what he was saying even when he had his back to me. My wife just looked at my face and immediately understood that I could hear.”

The new Baha 5 Power Sound Processor is ideal for people like Dennis who need more power, with hearing loss up to 55 dB SNHL. Compared to the previous generation (the Baha BP110 Power), it offers longer battery life, wireless capabilities including Made for iPhone support, and the design is totally new.

When trying it on for the first time, Dennis was favourably impressed; “It looks sleek. It looks nice. I like that the battery door is all self-contained.”

Baha-Power-colours

wearing-Baha-5-Power

The Baha 5 Power comes in five colours, the same as the Baha 5 Sound Processor, so you can choose a colour to match your hair. Dennis opted for the silver colour to blend in with his hair.

Baha-5-Power-features
Some of the features in this amazingly smart power sound processor are:

  • Direct-to-device wireless capabilities
  • New volume rocker – for easy volume control
  • Made for iPhone technology
  • Built-in tamper proof battery door
  • LED light – indicating if the device is working properly

Read more here!

 

How do I talk and stream music from my iPhone to my Baha 5 Sound Processor?

Baha-5-Smart-App-iphone

QuestionHello,
I am getting ready to get my new Baha 5 Sound Processor fitted next month, and I am wondering if I need a phone clip to pair my iPhone to my sound processor to talk and stream music from my phone? Please help I’m not sure how the new technology on the new Baha sound processor works.

Thanks a million, talk to you soon. //Keyaira

Answer: Dear Keyaria,

Congratulations on getting the Baha 5 Sound Processor!

With it, you can stream audio and phone calls directly from your iPhone, as long as it is a newer model (iPhone 5 or iPhone 6) without the need to use the Cochlear Wireless Phone Clip.

For more information, check out: Smart tip: pairing and connecting your Baha 5 Sound Processor to your iPhone

On top of that, you can download the Baha Smart App to control and personalise your hearing experience directly from your iPhone.

Click here to download the app for free, and then pair your iPhone to your sound processor:

  • Ensure your Baha 5 Sound Processor is turned OFF by opening the battery door
  • On your iPhone, turn on Bluetooth under Devices
  • Go to Settings > General > Accessibility >Hearing Aids
  • Turn ON your Baha 5 Sound Processor by closing the battery door. It’s now discoverable for 120 seconds.
  • Tap the name of your sound processor, once it appears
  • Accept pairing request

If your Baha 5 Sound Processor is paired, has a live battery, and is turned on, it will automatically connect once you start the Baha 5 Smart App. When the app is connected for the first time, it may need additional time to read required data from your sound processor.

Best of luck!

The Baha Blog team

Can the Baha 5 Sound Processor stream directly to Android phones?

Question: Do you know when or if the Baha 5 Sound Processor will be able to stream directly to Android phones like it does for the iPhone? I have the phone clip which streams to my Samsung Galaxy S5, but I would like the Baha 5 Sound Processor to stream directly to my Android phone, so I do not have the hassle of remembering to possess and turn on the phone clip.

Thank you. // James

Answer: Dear James, thank you for your question.

Currently, only Apple offers the technology to stream audio directly to a Baha sound processor. To stream sound and take phone calls from an Android phone you need the Cochlear Wireless Phone Clip.

The Baha 5 Sound Processor can also be controlled from an Android phone using the Cochlear Baha Control App. If you don’t already have the app installed, download it here:

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/ The Baha Blog team

Please help me adapt my Phone Clip to my office phone system!

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QuestionI have the Baha 4 Sound Processor and a Cochlear Wireless Phone Clip. LOVE IT! I am trying to adapt the Phone Clip to a Plantronics MDA200 with a SSP2714 USB Bluetooth adaptor, to my Toshiba office phone system :-). Any suggestions? // Teresa

Answer: Hi Teresa.

So happy to hear that you are enjoying your Baha System and the wireless accessories!

Here are the instructions to pair the Cochlear Wireless Phone Clip with Plantronics SSP2714-01 dongle:

1) Connect the SSP2714-01 to the MDA200 USB port

2) Put the Cochlear Wireless Phone Clip into pairing mode (see separate instructions coming with the Phone Clip)

3) The Plantronics SSP 2714-01 should discover the device and turn solid blue

4) Then hit the telephone button on the top of the MDA200 which should get the adapter flashing blue

Hope this helps!

~ Karin Humble, Senior Product Manager Wireless Accessories, Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions

mda200-plantronics

 

Proof lies beneath the surface – the DermaLock Abutment

For more than 30 years, titanium implants have been used in bone conduction hearing implant systems. Titanium is a truly remarkable metal with unique properties that make it ideal for human implantation. Its ability to osseointegrate (bond) with bone is the key to making a Baha System work.

Up until a few years ago, the abutment (part of the implant that sticks through the skin) was also made completely with titanium. While ideal for bonding with bone, titanium does not bond with soft tissue (skin and underlying layers). That’s why it used to be common practice to thin the soft tissue around the abutment. This technique worked well and is still performed today in some cases. However, there are many benefits to preserving the soft tissue around the abutment. These include faster surgery time, aesthetics and leaving in place as much of the body’s natural structures as possible to help prevent infections.

If you DON’T thin the soft tissue around a pure titanium abutment, the skin heals down around it instead of bonding with it. This creates a pocket between the abutment and the skin where debris and bacteria can accumulate. It also blocks the immune system from accessing the area, so it’s not able to fight off potential infections to keep the area healthy.

Scientists knew there were benefits from soft tissue preservation but also knew that titanium alone was not the solution. So that’s the challenge that Cochlear set our research and development team – create an abutment that would bond with the surrounding soft tissue.

In 2013 we released the first abutment specifically designed for soft tissue preservation – the Cochlear Baha DermaLock Abutment (BA400). The abutment is still made of titanium, but features a special surface scientifically known as Hydroxyapatite. This is a substance that is found naturally in your body. It’s what allows your teeth to stick out through your skin and remain healthy and bonded to your gums.

Titanium surface on Baha bone conduction implant

Close up view of a smooth titanium surface. Soft tissue does not bond with titanium the same way it does with bone.

DermaLock surface on Cochlear Baha implant

Close up view of the DermaLock surface, proven to promote integration (bonding) with soft tissue.

What is DermaLock

Baha user Randi with the DermaLock Abutment. No need for hair removal or skin thinning around the area

Before we release new technology there is a lot of work and research that goes into making sure our products will improve the lives of the people who rely on a Baha System to hear and be heard everyday. And after new technology is released there are always numerous, long-term, independent clinical studies that take place to evaluate and verify the benefits. By design these studies often take years to complete. This is of course also true for the DermaLock Abutment.

And now the results are in!

Researchers at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands have presented results that show integration actually happening in real people. They used advanced imaging techniques to study both a DermaLock Abutment and a traditional titanium abutment (used primarily by other companies) and how they react with the surrounding tissue.

They concluded that only the DermaLock Abutment achieved integration with soft tissue. This is a great achievement and proof that Cochlear’s dedication to innovation ensures people with a Baha System have access to the latest technology that helps to make hearing carefree.

“This study shows the importance of not only choosing the right Baha sound processor, but also an abutment technology that is accepted and integrated by the patient’s own tissue,” says Stina Wigren, MSc in Materials Science and biomaterials specialist at Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions. “Cochlear developed this ground breaking technology and is the only bone conduction company in the world that offers this. Strong research evidence underlies our continual improvement and innovative use of technologies.”

titanium surface on Baha abutment

This sample was taken from around a titanium abutment. The dark blue layers resemble the outer layers of skin, clearly showing that no soft tissue has bonded to the abutment.

dermalock surface on Baha abutment

This sample was taken from around a DermaLock abutment. The soft tissue has not hardened and resembles inner, living layers of skin. This indicates a bond with the DermaLock surface.

Read the whole article here.

 

 

The special edition of BATOD Magazine is all about bone conduction hearing solutions

BATOD-deaf-bone-conduction-hearing-implants This special PDF edition of BATOD Magazine tries to offer some clarifications of the world of bone conduction hearing solutions. BATOD stands for British Association of Teachers of the Deaf and in this issue they describe the difference between bone conduction solutions, the correct use of the term Baha (without capitals) and features stories from real Baha users. Among them are one of our guest bloggers, Arti Patel and teenager Bethan May Harvey who has written a blog about her struggles with hearing loss and bullying. arti-Baha-userBethan-Baha-user

NOTE: This magazine is market specific and may not reflect current practice in other markets/countries. Cochlear does not take responsibility for the factual content of the articles but respects that they reflect views and experiences of the authors themselves.

In the news: Insights from the Maker of the Smallest Implantable Hearing Device

baha-5-cochlear-smallest-sound-processor

Qmed has an in-depth article about the Baha 5 Sound Processor and Smart App where they feature an interview with Mats Dotevall, Director of Design & Development, Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions, Sweden.

Dotevall begins with explaining the difference between hearing aids, cochlear implants and bone conduction hearing solutions, and how the latter actually work:

“[A Baha System] is for people that have some sort of issue with the outer ear, the ear canal, or the middle-ear bones […] Basically, your inner ear might be very healthy but sound doesn’t reach it. So what we do is put an implant into the skull that integrates with the bone tissue. It vibrates and helps transmit sound to the inner ear. A sound processor picks up sound, amplifies it, and then vibrates the skull bone. The inner structure of the ear, the cochlea, and the hair-like stereocilia in the inner ear also vibrate. In that way, you can bypass the standard way of sound coming through the inner ear.

There is also another indication where the device is used: single-sided deafness. One side is completely deaf, which can be quite a big handicap in social environments, in the car, and so forth. For those patients, we put the device on the deaf side and then vibrate over to the hearing side.”

Qmed: How did the company make this the smallest bone conduction sound processor on the market?

Dotevall: “The key engine in all of this is the electromagnetic vibrator, which is small and it is driven by a small hearing device battery. We are using a different kind of architecture. The previous architecture had a simple design but it was asymmetrical. We made it symmetrical, which makes it more difficult to manufacture. Having this architecture makes the device much more efficient. With the same battery size, power output, and the same force from the vibrator, we could reduce the size substantially.”

Read the rest of the article here