Apply for the 2016 Cochlear Anders Tjellström UK & Ireland Scholarship now!

Cochlear_Anders_Tjellstrom_Scholarship

Could you – or anyone you know – apply for the Anders Tjellström UK & Ireland Scholarship?

The unique award is open to Baha recipients who are:

  • a UK or Irish resident and implanted at a UK or Irish Baha implant centre
  • currently completing their final year of school or sixth form college and who have been accepted onto a full-time university or other tertiary education course
  • 18 years or over at application deadline
  • mature students who have been accepted onto a full-time or other tertiary education course
  • students currently undertaking a full-time university degree or other tertiary education course
  • studying for a minimum of 2 years
  • previous applicants are eligible to apply if they meet the above criteria

Applicants must submit their completed application form with all supporting documentation and required information by the deadline. No late applications or part of the application pack will be accepted. Please do not send original documents where copies have been requested, as documents will not be returned.

Deadline date for applications: 30 November 2016

Read more and download the application here

It’s time to apply for Cochlear US scholarships!

Every year, the Cochlear Graeme Clark and Anders Tjellström Scholarships are awarded to students with Nucleus or Baha implants respectively, on the basis of academic achievement and a demonstrated commitment to the Cochlear ideals of leadership and humanity.

baha-cochlear-scholarship-2016

 

 

 

Meet the 2016 scholarship winners

 

 

 

 

If you or someone you know is a high school senior graduating in the spring of 2016 in the United States and Canada, and have applied to an accredited college, university or technical school in 2017, take the opportunity to win this scholarship of $2,000 per year for up to four years!

How to apply:

The Cochlear Graeme Clark Scholarship is a unique award open to Nucleus Cochlear Implant recipients. Download the application form here.

The Anders Tjellström Scholarship is a unique award open to Baha system recipients. Download the application form here.

Deadline:

All materials must be submitted to Cochlear Americas with a postmark no later than September 30, 2016.

Good luck!

Cochlear announces winners of 2016 Graeme Clark and Anders Tjellström scholarships

2016 Cochlear Scholarship Winners (PRNewsFoto/Cochlear)

Yesterday the winners of the US Graeme Clark and Anders Tjellström scholarships were announced! Named after hearing implant industry pioneers, the annual scholarships recognize Nucleus Implant and Baha System recipients who not only demonstrate exemplary success in their academic pursuits, but also leadership and humanity in their local communities.

“We are proud to recognize these eight exceptional students and reward them with college scholarships,” says Tony Manna, president of Cochlear Americas. “The winners overcame remarkable challenges and achieved so much in their young lives. We are excited to see what the next chapter has in store for this year’s scholarship recipients.”

Five students were recipients of the 2016 Graeme Clark Scholarship:

  1. Kelin McCloskey (Washington College) from Kennett Square, Pennsylvania
  2. Megan Zahneis (Miami University) from West Chester, Ohio
  3. Natalie Synder (Rochester Institute of Technology) from West Henrietta, New York
  4. Taylor Thompson (Purdue University) from Franklin, Indiana
  5. Willa Tsao (Cornell University) from Wind Lake, Wisconsin

Three students were awarded the 2016 Anders Tjellström Scholarship:

  1. Allison Villa (University of Mississippi) from Oak View, California
  2. Kathleen “McKenna” Nelson (University of North Carolina at Wilmington) from Greenville, North Carolina
  3. Skyler Mason (Arizona State University) from Phoenix, Arizona

“The Cochlear Baha System has allowed me to experience life more fully. I can hear my family and friends laughing, making jokes and sharing some of our favorite memories,” says Kathleen Nelson. “I’m also finally able to fully hear my violin when I play. The first time I played with full hearing was so powerful it moved me to tears.”

For more information about the scholarships, visit www.Cochlear.com/US/Scholarship.

 

 

 

A time to be thankful

This time of year is a great opportunity to reflect on what you are thankful for. For us here at Cochlear it’s incredibly rewarding to see how our products impact people’s lives. Today approximately 150-200 new people who couldn’t hear yesterday will be able to hear, thanks to the amazing technologies behind the Baha solution and cochlear implants.

For many of those people, the gift of sound is something they are very thankful for. But also to be part of the Cochlear family, around the world, sharing a special bond. Watch the video above to see some of our users across the globe.

If you or a loved one is experiencing hearing loss, the best thing you can do is to get help right away. Click here to find a hearing care professional in your area.

 

Cochlear donates Baha Softbands to people in need in Indonesia

Cochlear-donates-hearing-aids

This October, a team of volunteers from the ENT/Audiology team of Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+) Netherlands, travelled to the island of Lombok in Indonesia to provide health care, support and guidance on site.

The team provides voluntary help based on their own resources supported by the donations of others, such as medicine, materials, diagnostic equipment, hearing aids, assistive listening devices etc. Cochlear was one of the sponsors and donated a number of Baha Softbands for the team to take with them.

According to the team:

“Although there appears to be a lot of deaf and hearing impaired people on Lombok, there are barely any hearing devices. People have to fly or sail to Bali, where it costs about € 200 to get a hearing aid. For the local standards this is a lot of money. Deaf or hard of hearing children are usually considered stupid or crazy.”

The mission of this team of specialists was to check the ears and the hearing of those children, provide their surroundings with information on the different types of deafness and when indicated help those children to hear better by providing them with hearing devices.

cochlear-donating-hearing-aids-indonesia

The team was stationed in a school for disabled children and performed local ENT & Audiology consultations with ear/hearing checks and direct treatments for local people with limited resources. The transfer of knowledge is very important. The specialists provide as much information as they can to the local teachers and medics. The impact of diagnostics and treatment is high, as is the gratitude of the locals. Pain (often chronic inflammation) is remedied. The hearing and communication of children and local people can often be improved by treatment and fitting of hearing aids.

During two weeks of help more than 260 people were seen by the ENT physician, the hearing status of more than 90 people was evaluated, 25 patients were rehabilitated with 30 hearing aids, 40 ear molds were made and two patients were helped with a bone conduction device. This resulted in many happy faces back and forth.

cochlear-donates-baha-softband-indonesiaCochlear-donates-Baha-Softbands-to-poor-childrenThe team in action. They were facilitated by many donors, who provided them with medication, hearing aids,materials and assistive listening devices.


Cochlear-donates-hearing-aids-IndonesiaA young man from the inlands of Lombok who suffered chronic ear infections in the past can now hear better again by using a bone conduction hearing device on a Baha Softband provided by Cochlear

 

 

Proof lies beneath the surface – the DermaLock Abutment

For more than 30 years, titanium implants have been used in bone conduction hearing implant systems. Titanium is a truly remarkable metal with unique properties that make it ideal for human implantation. Its ability to osseointegrate (bond) with bone is the key to making a Baha System work.

Up until a few years ago, the abutment (part of the implant that sticks through the skin) was also made completely with titanium. While ideal for bonding with bone, titanium does not bond with soft tissue (skin and underlying layers). That’s why it used to be common practice to thin the soft tissue around the abutment. This technique worked well and is still performed today in some cases. However, there are many benefits to preserving the soft tissue around the abutment. These include faster surgery time, aesthetics and leaving in place as much of the body’s natural structures as possible to help prevent infections.

If you DON’T thin the soft tissue around a pure titanium abutment, the skin heals down around it instead of bonding with it. This creates a pocket between the abutment and the skin where debris and bacteria can accumulate. It also blocks the immune system from accessing the area, so it’s not able to fight off potential infections to keep the area healthy.

Scientists knew there were benefits from soft tissue preservation but also knew that titanium alone was not the solution. So that’s the challenge that Cochlear set our research and development team – create an abutment that would bond with the surrounding soft tissue.

In 2013 we released the first abutment specifically designed for soft tissue preservation – the Cochlear Baha DermaLock Abutment (BA400). The abutment is still made of titanium, but features a special surface scientifically known as Hydroxyapatite. This is a substance that is found naturally in your body. It’s what allows your teeth to stick out through your skin and remain healthy and bonded to your gums.

Titanium surface on Baha bone conduction implant

Close up view of a smooth titanium surface. Soft tissue does not bond with titanium the same way it does with bone.

DermaLock surface on Cochlear Baha implant

Close up view of the DermaLock surface, proven to promote integration (bonding) with soft tissue.

What is DermaLock

Baha user Randi with the DermaLock Abutment. No need for hair removal or skin thinning around the area

Before we release new technology there is a lot of work and research that goes into making sure our products will improve the lives of the people who rely on a Baha System to hear and be heard everyday. And after new technology is released there are always numerous, long-term, independent clinical studies that take place to evaluate and verify the benefits. By design these studies often take years to complete. This is of course also true for the DermaLock Abutment.

And now the results are in!

Researchers at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands have presented results that show integration actually happening in real people. They used advanced imaging techniques to study both a DermaLock Abutment and a traditional titanium abutment (used primarily by other companies) and how they react with the surrounding tissue.

They concluded that only the DermaLock Abutment achieved integration with soft tissue. This is a great achievement and proof that Cochlear’s dedication to innovation ensures people with a Baha System have access to the latest technology that helps to make hearing carefree.

“This study shows the importance of not only choosing the right Baha sound processor, but also an abutment technology that is accepted and integrated by the patient’s own tissue,” says Stina Wigren, MSc in Materials Science and biomaterials specialist at Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions. “Cochlear developed this ground breaking technology and is the only bone conduction company in the world that offers this. Strong research evidence underlies our continual improvement and innovative use of technologies.”

titanium surface on Baha abutment

This sample was taken from around a titanium abutment. The dark blue layers resemble the outer layers of skin, clearly showing that no soft tissue has bonded to the abutment.

dermalock surface on Baha abutment

This sample was taken from around a DermaLock abutment. The soft tissue has not hardened and resembles inner, living layers of skin. This indicates a bond with the DermaLock surface.

Read the whole article here.