Celebrating World Hearing Day on March 3 with the #happiestsound in the world

Celebrating World Hearing Day on March 3 with the #happiestsound in the world

The World Hearing Day is an annual advocacy event that fosters dialogue on ear care and prevention of hearing problems. In line with this year’s theme, “Action for hearing loss: make a sound investment”, Cochlear celebrates the World Hearing Day with an international campaign.

The importance of raising awareness on hearing impairment was first addressed in 2007 when the World Health Organization (WHO) and China Disabled Persons’ Federation (CDPF) partnered in an unprecedented initiative to voice the daily burden of some 360 million people affected by hearing disability. The World Hearing Day, formerly known as International Ear Care Day, resulted from the First International Conference on Prevention and Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment, jointly hosted by WHO and CDPF.

According to a 2012 WHO report, about 1 billion young people who are recreationally exposed to high sounds are at risk of developing long-term hearing problems. The same report points out that more than 60% of the childhood hearing loss cases can be prevented by taking specific measures. Coupled with the high incidence rate of hearing impairment in low and middle economies, these figures impose prompt action, and indicate a indicate a strong need to share knowledge and practices across territorial borders.

Awareness campaigns are therefore necessary, not only for spreading valuable information, but also to inspire and encourage people to get actively involved in promoting hearing health.

Cochlear is searching for the Happiest Sound in the World

The Happiest Sound in the World is a social media campaign that aims at raising worldwide awareness on hearing health. People from Sydney to Sao Paulo and London to Los Angeles are invited to share their #HappiestSound with the whole world. Participation is really simple and only takes a matter of minutes. Anyone can just share their happiest sound through video, audio, photograph or even write about it and then post it on social media using the hashtag #HappiestSound.

are invited to share the sounds that make them happiest by using the hashtag #happiestsound. The campaign runs through March 2, 2017, when the Happiest Sound in the World will be revealed.

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(#happiestsound user posts from happiestsound.com)

Visit happiestsound.com to see all happiest sounds, get information about posting, and submit your contact details if you participate in the campaign.

International Cochlear Implant Day and World Hearing Day at the Science Museum in London

Cochlear Europe Ltd invites all Cochlear™ Nucleus® and Cochlear™ Baha® implant recipients and their families to  International Cochlear Implant Day and World Hearing Day, a free of charge event held at the Science Museum in London on February 25, 2017.

linn_friends_guitarParticipants will have the opportunity to learn more about the latest innovations in hearing, meet other recipients, and interact with the Cochlear team. Access is also free for anyone who is considering a Cochlear or Baha implant.

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November 9 is Microtia Awareness Day

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November 9th is the first ever Microtia Awareness Day in the US, and is dedicated to spreading hope and knowledge concerning the congenital birth defect, which is named efter the Latin terms for little ears.

Approximately one out of every 8,000 babies are born with Microtia – a malformed outer ear – either on one or both sides. Children born with microtia will usually have a functioning inner ear, but as the outer and middle ear are affected, they will have conductive hearing loss. For children with microtia a conventional hearing aid is more than likely not an option, however they may benefit from a Baha solution that doesn’t require an outer ear to sit on and can bypass the problem and send sound directly to the inner ear.

The Ear Community Organization founded Microtia Awareness Day in 2016 and was submitted by the Tumblin family. Melissa Tumblin founded Ear Community in 2010 after stumbling through the hurdles and challenges of finding answers for her daughter when she was born with Microtia. Since then, Ear Community has brought over 6,500 people together from around the world at the organization’s events making it possible to share experiences and resources. The community is made up of not only children and adults with Microtia and their families, but teachers, advocates, and medical professionals from around the world who foster awareness and assistance for this amazing group of people. Board members either have the condition or a family member who does, so they have close personal experience with the obstacles from a myriad of perspectives. The Registrar at National Day Calendar approved Microtia Awareness Day in October.

Mark the calendar for Microtia Awareness Day for November 9th and think of the number 9 as the shape of an ear!

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Download the Atresia/Microtia folder here

10 Halloween tips ‘n tricks for kids with hearing loss

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Halloween is celebrated all over the world on 31 October. It’s thought to have originated with the medieval Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off roaming ghosts. Halloween became a major holiday in North America in the 19th century, thanks to mass Irish and Scottish immigration.

Nowadays the focus is less scary and more fun for children. To avoid any mishaps, here are some tips to help your hard of hearing little ones have a safe and fun Halloween:

  1. Before purchasing a costume, double check that the mask, hat or other headgear fits comfortably and securely around your child’s Baha sound processor(s)
  2. Apply any makeup, hairspray or glitter before putting on your child’s sound processor
  3. Make sure the sound processor is functioning properly before you leave the house
  4. Attach the sound processor securely with the Baha Safety Line
  5. Pack a flashlight with fresh batteries, extra sound processor batteries, and a mobile phone for the outing
  6. Consider using the wireless Mini Microphone for extra safety
  7. Decorate costumes with reflective tape for trick-or-treating
  8. Guide young children from house to house always keeping at their side or holding their hands, particularly at crosswalks
  9. Instruct your kids not to eat any of the candy until they come home and have had the treats examined by an adult
  10. Have fun!

Dress bright and loud for Loud Shirt Day to show support for hearing impaired children

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Friday October 21, 2016 is Loud Shirt Day – a major annual fundraiser when people are encouraged to wear their brightest and ‘LOUDEST’ clothes to help give the gift of sound and speech to hard-of-hearing and deaf children. Loud Shirt Day was created in South Australia 16 years ago and has now spread across Australia, New Zealand and more recently into the UK and North America.

Hearing loss is the most common congenital birth defect, with 3 out of every 1000 babies born diagnosed with a hearing impairment or deafness. Early intervention is vital and benefits children’s development in speech, language and psycho-social skills.

Everyone who wants to can get involved by making a donation to the Cora Barclay Centre and showing off their best loud outfits – the brighter and more outrageous the better.

“It’s a great excuse to wear your brightest clothes and raise some much needed money”, says Cora Barclay Centre Chief Executive Officer Michael Forwood. “Or just wear something extra loud on the day and encourage others to do the same. Whether you fancy stripes, florals, polka dots or Hawaiian shirts, as long as your outfit has colour and pizzazz, it will be perfect for Loud Shirt Day.”

 

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The idea is to create awareness in a fun way.

And of course –

“DON’T forget to share photos of yourself with the hashtag #LoudShirtDay to let everyone know how easy and fun it is to be involved!” Mr Forwood emphasised.

 

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Read more on the official site: Loud Shirt Day

Raising a child with Treacher Collins syndrome

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The 2012 children’s novel Wonder is being adapted into a Hollywood movie starring Julia Roberts.

Wonder tells the story about a 10-year boy with Treacher Collins syndrome who starts school after being home-schooled for years. Jacob Trembley plays the boy, Auggie, who gets bullied because of his rare facial medical deformity. The film is scheduled for release in April, 2017.

Treacher Collins syndrome is a rare, genetic condition affecting the way the face develops — especially the cheekbones, jaws, ears and eyelids. These differences often cause problems with breathing, swallowing, chewing, hearing and speech.

How severe the syndrome is varies widely from child to child. Treacher Collins syndrome is present when a baby is born (congenital).

The syndrome occurs in about 1 in 50,000 newborns worldwide.

Blogger Eloise, herself a parent of a child with the syndrome, shares both her concerns and hopes for the film in this blog:

Ten things about parenting a child with Treacher Collins Syndrome

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Read more: How children with Treacher Collins and hearing loss can benefit from a Baha solution

Lipreading Awareness Week: Turn down the noise in restaurants!

Last week, 12-19 September, was National Lipreading Awareness Week in the UK. More than 10 million Brits suffer from hearing loss and while some are helped by hearing devices, a number of people still have to rely on lipreading.

ATLA – the Association of Teachers of Lipreading to Adults – are now asking restaurants to choose a day to invite their customers to ‘come and enjoy their taste in food, not their taste in music’.

In return ATLA will give participating restaurants some basic deaf awareness training for their staff, a poster to display of their local lipreading class and a press release template to send to the local media.

“Many hard of hearing people avoid going to restaurants because it’s just too difficult for them to follow conversations and pick out the sounds they want to hear,” says ATLA’s vice-chair Molly Berry. “But minimum investment can fix this and make a restaurant a much more pleasant environment for everyone to hear each other and hold conversations in, not just the hard of hearing.”

Other than turning down the music, here are some easy tips for restaurants to cut down the background noise:

  • Introduce more soft furnishings such as curtains, cushions and carpet
  • Acoustic ceiling tiles which dampen the sound
  • Ensure good lighting so lipreaders can see the face of the person speaking

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If you are a Baha 5 user, you can prepare for the evening by bringing your Wireless Mini Microphone. Pin it on your companion’s collar or put it on the table to pick up the conversation all around. Choose between two different versions.

What do YOU think about dining out? Are restaurants today too noisy?

 

Read also: Choosing a restaurant when you have hearing loss