How the Baha System helped Jamie pursue her love of music: guest blog

This blog was adapted from its original article on Hear and Now, a Cochlear Americas recipient blog. Read it here.


 

Jamie G. has conductive hearing loss, and the Baha System has helped her pursue her love of music.

Jamie G. has conductive hearing loss, and the Baha System has helped her pursue her love of music.

At the age of 14, I was asked by my otolaryngologist what I wanted to be when I grew up. Excitedly, I told him I wanted to be a singer. He then explained that music wouldn’t be a good choice for me.

I developed many ear infections and battled a cholesteatoma in my early years. I lost most of my hearing in my left ear even after numerous reconstruction surgeries. Because of this, my ability to sing should be out of the question. Shortly after that, I sent him a tape of my recordings. After a listen, my doctor wholeheartedly supported my decision to pursue music.

Hearing loss certainly didn’t make my life easy. It made me withdrawn, depressed and a shy girl in school. But music was one avenue that made me feel confident and secure. I loved feeling the sounds of the bass in my chest as I listened to my favorite artist, the drums vibrating in my feet, or the soprano’s high notes bringing my hearing to clarity. In order to perform, practicing music had to consume most of my time, but I didn’t mind. Reading music, counting rhythms and knowing chord progressions took time, but it was vital in order for me to be successful as a musician.

Thankfully, I outgrew the ugly battle with the cholesteatoma. Sadly, my hearing could never be restored. Hearing aids were not an option due to my ear’s inability to move any drainage or wax. So for 30 years I adjusted my life around my hearing loss.

In July 2015, I was referred to an ENT-otolaryngologist in Kansas City for a second opinion. That visit changed how I looked at my future. I was a strong candidate for the Baha® Implant System due to my conductive hearing loss. It didn’t take much thought to know that the Baha System was the right decision for me.

My switch-on date was December 2017. I slowly adjusted to this new, but amazing world. My world of quiet was replaced with new sounds. I could now hear that thumping bass line without having to just feel it in my chest. I could hear my voice not only when I sang those soprano notes, but I loved to hear the rich lower tones of my voice now. I didn’t have to make sure I performed in a certain spot on stage. I had the freedom to move wherever I needed to be. I still prefer to be near the drums, feeling the music in my feet and chest while I express my songs.

I chose Cochlear because of my musical lifestyle. I needed access to streaming without a separate device. But I also wanted to connect my device to any in-ear monitor system while performing. I knew I needed the best technology for my device to function in all areas of my life, so I choose the Baha 5 Sound Processor.

Jamie G. uses the Baha System to help explore her love of music.

Jamie G. uses the Baha System to help explore her love of music.

When I first got it, I made sure my settings were adjusted to my liking, and it took a few trips to the audiologist to get it just right. I love the ability to switch modes. When I listen or perform, I need my Baha 5 Sound Processor to adjust to the sound of the music. The tones I want when I sing or listen to music are certainly different that my daily mode.

I use my Cochlear True Wireless Mini Microphone every time I perform with my monitor system. Using a Y-adapter plugged into the monitor, I plug in my Mini Mic to one jack, my in-ear headphones to the other. Once I pair my Mini Mic to my Baha 5 Sound Processor, I hear every tone of the piano, the full sound of the acoustic guitar, the intricate bass line, my vocals moving in progression with the band…all in stereo – in both ears!

My musicianship has improved and excelled in a way I only could dream of a few years ago. I can now lead musically, knowing exactly what needs to be done to move the band to a more unified and excellent sound.

Because of my increased musical abilities with the Baha 5 Sound Processor, I got to hit the studio for my very first recording a year after my implant. While using my Baha System, I recorded a CD with a full live band. It was a beautiful experience to see and hear my own songs come alive and to be able to hear them fully and in true form.

Hearing loss made me appreciate my gift of music through expression. But the Baha System has given me the gift to hear that expression fully.

I look forward to more recording sessions and producing many more songs that have yet to be written! To hear a sample of my music or to purchase a download of my CD, you can visit jamiegroshart.com.

The opinions expressed in this blog are my own views and not those of Cochlear.


 

If you are dealing with constant ear infections or a cholesteatoma impacting your hearing, click here to find a solution to help you get better hearing.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

When losing something leads to something ‘wonderful’: Dwight’s experience upgrading to the Baha 5 Sound Processor

When losing something leads to something ‘wonderful’: Dwight’s experience upgrading to the Baha 5 Sound Processor

This blog was adapted from its original article on Hear and Now, a Cochlear Americas recipient blog. Read it here.


Dwight J. of Colorado streams a phone call directly into his Baha 5 Sound Processor.

Dwight J. of Colorado streams a phone call directly into his Baha 5 Sound Processor.

Sometimes losing something important to you turns out to be surprisingly “wonderful.” Just take it from Dwight J. in Colorado, U.S.

After a day of hiking, Dwight noticed he could not hear as well as he was used to. He reached up and discovered his BP100 Sound Processor was gone. He looked everywhere for it, but he realised he must have lost it while out on the hike.

Dwight acted quickly and called Cochlear to get a replacement. To his surprise, the representative told him Cochlear no longer offered the BP100. They introduced Dwight to the Baha 5 Sound Processor, and he knew he wanted an upgrade.

“It’s wonderful,” Dwight said after upgrading.

He said he especially likes being able to connect to his sound processor with Bluetooth, stream phone calls and stream radio directly to his sound processor while out on a walk.

Dwight also said he carries his Cochlear Wireless Mini Microphone with him wherever he goes. “I put it on whoever I’m talking to, if I’m in a loud situation, so that I’m able to hear them,” he said.

When it comes to continuing his journey as a part of the Baha family, Dwight seems thrilled.

“Cochlear culture oozes with a four-letter word: care,” he said. “They care about people.”

Dwight is a member of his local chapter of Cochlear Community, a Cochlear Americas program that connects Cochlear recipients in the U.S.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

 

World Down Syndrome Day and hearing loss: Celebrating children like Chloe

The following is a re-post of a guest blog from 2014 about Chloe, who was born with Down syndrome and lived with hearing loss until she was implanted with the Baha System at 10 years old in 2010. Chloe was 14 when her mother Jane wrote this guest blog to share with us the affect Chloe’s Baha implant had on her life. Join us in marking World Down Syndrome Day today (21 March) and celebrating children like Chloe.


It’s been a while since you last heard about Chloe. She is now 14, in year nine at senior school and even more of a little madam than when we last met four years ago.

Unfortunately Chloe’s health hasn’t been very good the past two years. She has had some major operations which have left her bed bound for weeks, and in and out of hospitals. Chloe has shown incredible strength and determination, both because that’s the type of girl she is and because she was able to communicate effectively with hospital staff and myself.

This is all thanks to her Baha sound processor. Chloe’s language skills and attention skills have flourished over the last four years; her vocabulary has grown, she is learning new words each day and she is definitely more attentive to those talking to her (apart from when she chooses not to!). This meant the hospital staff was able talk her through what was going to happen and she could indicate her pain levels and talk to the doctors.

I dread to think how she would have coped six or seven years ago, when her hearing levels were so low, and she hardly had any language. The world would have been a very lonely and scary place for her.

Chloe still loves drama and attends a very good secondary school that specialises in drama so she can devote more time to her passion. She is still my drama queen and a budding actress, dancer and musician. Obviously she is becoming a young lady and her life is changing. Developing language and communication skills has played a big part in this and will continue to do so.

My one aim for my daughter has been to become as independent as her disability would allow her. The Baha [System] has contributed to the success of this aim. She can order her food in restaurants. She can shop at the supermarket. She is also very good at being a typical teenage and slamming doors on me!

So am I pleased with the Baha [System]? Yes, my only regret is that I didn’t push for it sooner. I would recommend it for any parent or young person who needs it. Read the literature, speak to the professionals and if you feel it right go for it! It opens many doors and not once have we looked back.”

Jane lives in Birmingham, UK. In 2013 she won the Birmingham Parent of the Year Award for her tireless work with a special needs support group, as well as caring for her own two children who both have special needs.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

‘Lighting a candle in the dark’: Dennis reflects on his hearing journey with the Baha family

‘Lighting a candle in the dark’: Dennis reflects on his hearing journey with the Baha family

This blog was adapted from its original article on Hear and Now, a Cochlear Americas recipient blog. Read it here.


Sometimes life takes an unexpected turn and we find our “status quo” has been uprooted. When things are not going according to plan, it can be easy to feel lost.

But that does not mean it is the end. In fact, it may be a new beginning.

Meet Dennis, a Baha® 5 SuperPower recipient. He had normal hearing until 2012, when he went to the doctor because he suspected he had swimmer’s ear or inflammation.

Instead, Dennis was diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma— a rare, non-cancerous tumor that presses on the eighth cranial nerve leading from the brain to the inner ear. Common symptoms include hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo.

Doctors estimated that his tumor had been growing for about 20 years.

“As the tumor grows, it takes up space, and by the time we found it, my hearing was down to 30 percent in the right ear—nothing usable,” Dennis said. “I could hear pings and single tones, (but) I could not understand what people were saying.”

Doctors told him his treatment options were surgery or radiation. Dennis opted for surgery in April 2013 to make sure the tumor was completely removed.

Six months later, at a post-surgery follow-up with his ENT, Dennis first learned about the Baha System. That was when everything changed.

“As a test, he put a Baha [sound processor] on my head, on a metal band,” Dennis recalled. “He stood behind me five feet or so and whispered words. When I realized it was picking up the sounds I was missing, I realised I’d like to have something to ‘harvest the sound’ from the deaf side.”

He had abutment surgery in December 2013, and by February 2014 Dennis was fitted with the BP110 processor. He said it helped him to become more aware of his surroundings.

“People couldn’t sneak up beside me on my right side, and I was aware somebody was there. That was basically why I did it,” Dennis said.

In March 2017, he upgraded to the Baha 5 SuperPower. Dennis said one of his favorite features is the rechargeable batteries.

“When I wore the BP110, I was replacing the battery every ten days,” he said. “The SuperPower takes rechargeable batteries, so it actually works out better because I can get a day and a half out of a rechargeable battery. With the cost of disposable batteries, it’ll pay itself off after a while.”

Reflecting on his journey and his advice for others, Dennis compared hearing loss to navigating in the dark. It’s a lot easier when you have a light.

“Light a candle, don’t blame the darkness,” he said. “What do you have to lose?”

For more information on the Baha 5 SuperPower, click here. To find a hearing specialist near you, click here.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

Tech features make Baha 5 series easy to love; now it’s time for an upgrade: guest blog

By Tom de Beer, Netherlands

Cochlear Baha System recipient Tom de Beer. Submitted photo.

Cochlear Baha System recipient Tom de Beer. Submitted photo.

Some people have said to me that with a disability, following your dreams is so much harder, if not impossible. But boy, did I prove those people wrong.

My name is Tom de Beer – I’m a 21-year-old IT student from the Netherlands, and I also blog about tech. I currently hold two diplomas from community college: one in IT Support Engineering, and one in Network Engineering. I am now continuing my studies in IT & Business at Fontys University of Applied Sciences. I am also the Editor-in-Chief at Dutch Tech Blog, where I write about Apple and other major tech companies like Microsoft, Intel, Synology and more. I have worked with different PR organisations to improve the quality of my content as well. I really enjoy what I’m doing in my life. But I won’t lie. It hasn’t been very easy to get where I am right now.

I would like to share with you how I’ve managed my hearing loss, going from near-deafness at birth to bone conduction treatment and the Baha 5 Power upgrade I will receive this summer.

I was born with severe to profound hearing loss on both sides. I did not get hearing aids as a baby because it took a few years before doctors found out what caused my hearing loss. From that point I was given the benefit of electronic devices that have helped me hear.

My first hearing devices were the so-called ‘Behind-the-Ear’ (BTE) hearing aids, which I got when I was two or three years old. And they did help me to communicate with people. But I often had issues with them, one of them being that the ear pieces got constantly ‘blocked’ by an excess of ear wax my ears were producing.

I knew I wanted a solution that was more discreet. Being able to wear hearing devices without them being 100% visible doesn’t make me feel as ‘paranoid’ anymore about what people might think of me. I know what you’re thinking: “You shouldn’t have to feel ashamed of your hearing loss!” And believe me, I’m definitely not ashamed of my hearing disability. In fact, I am proud to be sharing my story.

Fast-forward to 2012, I had my annual hearing test and my audiologist mentioned something called the Cochlear Baha System. I had no idea what he was talking about. He explained to me that what made it different is the process of bone conduction: how sound travels through the bones of my skull to my cochlea. It sounded very interesting. So I went looking for more information, and finally decided to ask my ear specialist for his thoughts about it. He said a Baha System could really help improve my hearing experience. After some consideration, I finally went for it and decided to get an implant and abutment for the Baha Connect System on my left side.

In 2013 I received my very first bone anchored sound processor, after having tested two of them. I wasn’t too happy with the first one. The sound did not feel natural to me and the device felt bulky and heavy. The second one, a Baha 3 (BP110) Power was a different story. I immediately started hearing sounds I wouldn’t have heard before – for example tapping on the desk with your fingertips. I also heard conversations in certain situations better wearing this device. As exaggerated as it may sound, the experience felt like a miracle.

Two years after my first surgery, I went under the knife again to get a second implant on my right side, because I felt like I was missing something. I got the Baha 4 Sound Processor. What I found cool about it was that it supported some accessories that allow for connecting with your mobile phone.

Bilateral recipient Tom de Beer wears his Baha 3 Power on his left side and his Baha 4 Sound Processor on his right side. Submitted photo.

Bilateral recipient Tom de Beer wears his Baha 3 Power on his left side and his Baha 4 Sound Processor on his right side. Submitted photo.

Late 2017, I realised that it had been 4 and a half years since I received my first Baha processor, and it was time for an upgrade. I read about the Baha 5 family of sound processors, and I learned that they had ‘Made for iPhone’ technology. Obviously, as a tech nerd and a big Apple fan I absolutely needed that one. So I contacted my audiologist to ask him about my options. He told me I couldn’t upgrade until July, but he proposed trying one out for a few weeks. And of course I wanted to do that!

As I am writing this, I am wearing the Baha 5 Power on my left side. It is a phenomenal device. Of course, the sound quality is great. In fact, voice quality has notably improved over its predecessor. For me, another major compelling reason to upgrade is that ‘Made for iPhone’ technology I just mentioned. Setting it up is very easy, and everything else is incredibly seamless. Audio is automatically streamed to my sound processor, and I can even use my phone as a microphone. Being able to see the battery percentage of the device is a nice touch as well. Using the Baha 5 Smart app I can even adjust the low and high tones. I appreciate that bit of customisability.

But how is my daily experience? Let me start by saying that the obvious struggles are there. There are lots of moments where I have no idea what somebody is saying, and I don’t dare to ask them to repeat something. Especially if it has to be more than a few times. Luckily, in most situations people show respect for my disability and try to make me feel as comfortable as needed.

My parents, family and close friends have always supported me in a way that one might dream of. And not just when it comes to my hearing loss, but also in my ambitions to become whatever I want to become. That is also where I have proved many people wrong: that in spite of my hearing loss I still got where I wanted to be. And I haven’t even finished yet!


Tom de Beer, 21, is a tech student and blogger from the Netherlands. You can find Dutch Tech Blog at dutch-tech.nl.

Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

Following Shay’s hearing journey: from Softband to implant at age 11

Michelle and her daughter Shalynn, 11

Michelle and her daughter Shay, who wears a Softband.

By Michelle Robinson

When my daughter Shay was around one year old, I noticed that she was not reacting to loud noises like other children, so I decided to take her to have her hearing checked. Her family and I found out that she had moderate hearing loss in her right ear and that she had had it since birth. Although doctors did a hearing test when Shay was a newborn, we were not informed at the time that she failed it.

A short time after learning of Shay’s hearing loss, we made an appointment with our local ear, nose and throat specialist. The specialist confirmed that she had moderate hearing loss and nerve damage to her right ear. She needed a hearing aid. Shay received her first among many hearing aids at the age of two. In the years that followed, she has had several hearing exams, but due to her young age we were uncertain about what she was truly hearing.

When Shay was nine and a half I took her in for a routine hearing check, where we found out that her hearing loss was much more severe than we had thought. We learned she couldn’t hear voices and typical speech patterns. It turns out a normal hearing aid was not working for her at all.

My heart sank with this news. Shay not being able to hear out of her right ear was a huge concern: she was struggling in school because she couldn’t hear the teacher; it was difficult for her to ride her bike or play outside because she couldn’t hear when a car was coming up behind her.

The doctor explained to us the process of bone conduction, and he said he believed Shay would be a perfect candidate for the Baha System. We made an appointment right away with the Michigan Ear Institute. Doctors there confirmed that she has severe mixed hearing loss (a combination of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss) in her right ear, and that a normal hearing aid would not work for her. We discussed the Baha System and decided that it would be our best option.

After doing some investigating I learned about the Baha Softband, normally used for very young children. Shay has had the Softband for a little over a year now. It was like night and day: finally, she could hear! I’ve included a video of her hearing with the Softband for the first time with this blog. After a little more than a year and after seeing the difference it has made in her life, we knew it was time to replace the Softband. This December at the age of 11, Shay will have implant surgery to start her new life with the Baha Connect System. She is so excited to keep hearing better!

Michelle Robinson lives in Cheboygan, Michigan, U.S., and is the mother of 11-year-old Baha recipient Shalynn Robinson.

What You Need to Know: 10 FAQs on the Bone Conduction Procedure

Have you tried the Baha® 5 sound processor on a Baha Softband and decided to move on with a bone conduction implant? Has your child been scheduled for the implant procedure and you need to know how to prepare?

Jennifer Brown, Clinical Product Manager at Cochlear and audiologist, answers the ten most frequently asked questions about the bone conduction procedure.

Jennifer has more than six years of clinical experience in the United States with both pediatric and adult cochlear implant recipients, and she has worked for Cochlear in a variety of roles for the past four years.

(Picture: an audiologist fits a Baha Softband on a toddler’s head. A Baha 5 sound processor is attached to the Softband)

FAQ

1. How do I prepare for the implant procedure?

The good news is that no special preparations are needed before the procedure. The procedure is fast and minimally invasive. Your physician will give you all the details to plan for a successful procedure.

2. Will the procedure be painful?

The procedure is performed under anesthesia. The type of anaesthesia – local or general – is determined by a number of factors, like age, or pre-existing conditions. Ultimately, which anesthesia is right for you is determined by you and your surgeon. Post-operatively, you may experience swelling or skin sensitivity at the implant site. Should it be necessary, your doctor can prescribe pain reliever. Always discuss the procedure and any concerns you may have with your surgeon.

3. Will I be able to go home from the hospital the same day?

In the vast  majority of cases, patients go home the same day. While rare, sometimes in the case of small children or individuals with multiple involvements, the physician may take a precaution and keep the patient over night, but this seldom happens.

4. Can I shower after the procedure?

Usually, patients are allowed to shower the day after procedure. Avoid rubbing the area when drying as this may knock off the healing cap. Cover the cap area by holding a dry towel over it. Here’s what Dr. Pete Weber said in an earlier post.

“The site will still get wet. Since the incision is now very small for Baha Connect surgery, getting the site wet is usually not an issue. Full shower when cap and packing off. The best shampoos to use are the hypoallergenic ones, such as baby shampoos. I also let my Baha Attract patients shower the next day after removing the dressing. Again telling them to pat dry the area and not rub.”

5. If I choose an abutment or a magnet system, how long after surgery until I can wear the sound processor?

Different countries have different regulations.

  • If you choose the abutment system – Baha Connect: depending on where you live it can be anywhere from two weeks to three months before receiving the sound processor.
  • If you choose the magnet system – Baha Attract: depending on where you live it can be anywhere from two weeks to five weeks before receiving the sound processor.

Your doctor will examine the implant site before fitting the sound processor.

6. Are post-operative skin infections common and how are they treated?

As discussed in question 2, there could be swelling or sensitivity at the implant site after the procedure. Post-operative skin infections might occur, although the probability is low. Most skin-related issues happen in the abutment system, because it is skin protruding. In most cases, issues are mild, and can be resolved medically after consultation with your physician. Usually, the skin issues do not affect your ability to wear the sound processor. In the rare incident of persistent skin issues, it may be beneficial to transition to the magnet system.

7. How do I know if an abutment system or a magnet system is appropriate for me?

Both of the Cochlear Baha systems are indicated for individuals with hearing loss in one ear (single-sided deafness, or SSD), or for individuals with conductive/mixed hearing loss.  Whether to choose a Baha Connect or a Baha Attract depends upon a variety of factors, including the degree of hearing loss.

The magnetic system – Baha Attract – is a transcutaneous, or an under-the-skin implant system.  It is comprised of the internal fixture, with a magnet attached to it.  Individuals with the hearing losses noted above are candidates for this system, but it is important to remember that because the sound must pass through the skin, it may be necessary to use a more powerful sound processor, like the Baha 5 Power or the Baha 5 SuperPower.

The abutment system – Baha Connect – is a percutaneous, or through-the-skin implant system.  It too, uses the internal fixture but has an abutment attached to it.  It is appropriate for individuals with SSD or conductive/mixed hearing loss, but unlike the Baha Attract system, there is no skin attenuation of the sound.   This is a great option for individuals needing more power.

In some instances, it may be possible or necessary to transition from one system to another.  For instance, if a recipient chooses the Baha Attract system, and notices a change in his/her hearing, it is possible to remove the magnet and attach an abutment to eliminate dampening of the sound through the skin and to offer more direct bone conduction. Conversely, if a recipient needs to transition to a completely under-the-skin system because of lifestyle or soft tissue concerns, the abutment can be removed and the magnet can be attached.  In both instances, the recipient can likely continue to use the same sound processor.  Cochlear is the only manufacturer that allows for this flexibility based on the patient’s needs.

8. Why do I have to wait so long before I get fitted with a sound processor?

Bone bonds well to titanium, which is what the internal fixture is comprised of. To allow for osseointegration, it is recommended that appropriate healing time be allotted. In an abutment system, the surrounding skin also needs time to adhere to the abutment, to minimize skin issues. In a magnet system, it is important to wait the allotted time to give a chance for the swelling to reduce so that the patient can wear the weakest external magnet possible and still have adequate retention.

9. Will my child need a new implant as she or he grows?

No, an implant is designed for life. There are no pediatric-specific implants, abutments, or magnets. In the event that the child’s hearing changes, non-surgical options – such as a more powerful sound processor – should be tried first. Only in the event of a transition would a procedure be required, but keep in mind the same internal implant is used.

10. Will the Baha® System affect my child’s choices in sports or other activities?

A bone conduction implant is designed to allow your child a world of sound in every activity. While hearing loss is the most important factor to consider when choosing an abutment or a magnet system, lifestyle plays an important role. Some sports may be more conducive to having an under-the-skin magnet system.  It is important to choose a manufacturer that offers your child choices in hearing solutions – whether an abutment, or a magnet.

Remember, communication is key. Always discuss your options and thoughts with your audiologist and surgeon. Your hearing professional will be able to provide timely, accurate, and documented information.