Useful tips to make the most of Save Your Hearing Day on May 31

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World Health Organisation

Rounding out Better Hearing and Speech Month is Save Your Hearing Day on May 31. 

 

Save Your Hearing Day is meant to remind us of the ways we can prevent some causes of hearing loss.

Hearing loss can be caused by many factors, including age, noise exposure, genetics, illnesses and disorders, medications or physical trauma. Despite the many and varied causes of hearing loss, the American Academy of Audiology estimates that up to half of cases of impairment are preventable.

Noise-induced hearing loss is completely preventable and occurs when the hair cells in the cochlea, or inner ear, are damaged by exposure to loud noise.

Here are some simple actions you can take to help prevent certain kinds of hearing loss:

  • Be careful using ear bud headphones, and always heed warnings from your device about high volume.
  • Pay attention to how long and how often you’re listening to music on your devices, and try to reduce that time. For example, perhaps you listen to loud music while working out at the gym several times a week.
  • Ask your doctor whether hearing loss or tinnitus is a possible side effect when prescribed a new medication.
  • Wear ear protection when you know you will be exposed to loud noise, like at a concert, at a sporting event, or when working around construction.
  • Store hearing protection in noisy vehicles you may use. For example, in a motorcycle pack or in storage on a motorboat.
  • Consider purchasing appliances and devices for your home with low noise ratings.
  • If you are exposed to noise at work, talk to your supervisor or human resources department about ear protection and controlling noise in your work environment.
  • Schedule routine hearing check-ups with a health professional so you can track your hearing health yearly.

Did you know the sound from a sporting event can damage your hearing after just a few minutes? This video gives a good overview of the way some of the sounds we’re commonly exposed to can affect our hearing:

Is it time for your next hearing check-up? Click here to find a clinic near you.

Tips and tricks: How to wear and customise your Baha SoundArc

Tips and tricks: How to wear and customise your Baha SoundArc

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The Baha SoundArc is the newest hearing solution for people who live with conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness (SSD). It is the world’s first non-surgical, behind-the-head bone conduction hearing device, specially designed for children who are not ready for a bone conduction implant and adults who want to trial bone conduction in everyday situations.

Whether you’ve got a SoundArc already or you’re ready to learn more about it, these how-to videos give great tips on how you can get the most out of the SoundArc.

soundarc_topshot_all_colours3_PPTThe Baha SoundArc comes in a range of sizes and features your choice between a variety of coloured tips, where available. You can choose to match your clothing, your hair or your mood. Choose between black, grey or brown tips to discreetly match hair color — or opt instead for green, pink or turquoise tips to add style to an outfit. Watch the first video below to learn how to change the coloured tips.

Don’t worry, your hearing care professional will ensure your Baha SoundArc has the proper fit when you first try it on. Still, this next video is a useful reference for when you need to take it off and put it back on throughout your demo period, or if you or your child is wearing it for a longer term. Watch the video below to learn how to properly wear the SoundArc.

If you are wearing two sound processors on your SoundArc, your hearing care professional will set up your SoundArc for bilateral use. You can refer to this last video if you need to adjust or remove the connector discs for any reason during the period you will be wearing the device. Watch the video below to learn how to assemble the Baha SoundArc for bilateral use.


LEARN MORE: Click here to read more about the Baha SoundArc, ideal for use as a demo device, or for children not yet ready for an implant.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

Meet the team who helped create the new Baha SoundArc: videos

Meet the team who helped create the new Baha SoundArc: videos

Meet the team who helped to innovate the new Cochlear Baha SoundArc.

Meet the team who helped to innovate the new Cochlear Baha SoundArc.

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes as Cochlear develops the latest hearing tech? If you’re curious about the new Baha SoundArc, Cochlear’s newest non-surgical bone conduction solution, look no further. In the two videos below, the teams behind the SoundArc describe the challenges and successes of this totally new design.

In the first video, listen to Henrik Fyrlund (Senior Project Engineer Technology Development), Stefan Magnander (Senior Mechanical Engineer) and Fredrik Boivie (NPI Project Leader) describe the challenges of designing the SoundArc as well as key moments in its development.

 

In part two, watch Linnea Agostino (Product Manager) and Jenny Andersson (Clinical Research Audiologist) talk about some of the features that make the SoundArc special when compared to other non-surgical bone conduction solutions.


LEARN MORE: Click here to read more about the Baha SoundArc, ideal for use as a demo device, or for children not yet ready for an implant.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

How the Baha System helped Jamie pursue her love of music: guest blog

This blog was adapted from its original article on Hear and Now, a Cochlear Americas recipient blog. Read it here.


 

Jamie G. has conductive hearing loss, and the Baha System has helped her pursue her love of music.

Jamie G. has conductive hearing loss, and the Baha System has helped her pursue her love of music.

At the age of 14, I was asked by my otolaryngologist what I wanted to be when I grew up. Excitedly, I told him I wanted to be a singer. He then explained that music wouldn’t be a good choice for me.

I developed many ear infections and battled a cholesteatoma in my early years. I lost most of my hearing in my left ear even after numerous reconstruction surgeries. Because of this, my ability to sing should be out of the question. Shortly after that, I sent him a tape of my recordings. After a listen, my doctor wholeheartedly supported my decision to pursue music.

Hearing loss certainly didn’t make my life easy. It made me withdrawn, depressed and a shy girl in school. But music was one avenue that made me feel confident and secure. I loved feeling the sounds of the bass in my chest as I listened to my favorite artist, the drums vibrating in my feet, or the soprano’s high notes bringing my hearing to clarity. In order to perform, practicing music had to consume most of my time, but I didn’t mind. Reading music, counting rhythms and knowing chord progressions took time, but it was vital in order for me to be successful as a musician.

Thankfully, I outgrew the ugly battle with the cholesteatoma. Sadly, my hearing could never be restored. Hearing aids were not an option due to my ear’s inability to move any drainage or wax. So for 30 years I adjusted my life around my hearing loss.

In July 2015, I was referred to an ENT-otolaryngologist in Kansas City for a second opinion. That visit changed how I looked at my future. I was a strong candidate for the Baha® Implant System due to my conductive hearing loss. It didn’t take much thought to know that the Baha System was the right decision for me.

My switch-on date was December 2017. I slowly adjusted to this new, but amazing world. My world of quiet was replaced with new sounds. I could now hear that thumping bass line without having to just feel it in my chest. I could hear my voice not only when I sang those soprano notes, but I loved to hear the rich lower tones of my voice now. I didn’t have to make sure I performed in a certain spot on stage. I had the freedom to move wherever I needed to be. I still prefer to be near the drums, feeling the music in my feet and chest while I express my songs.

I chose Cochlear because of my musical lifestyle. I needed access to streaming without a separate device. But I also wanted to connect my device to any in-ear monitor system while performing. I knew I needed the best technology for my device to function in all areas of my life, so I choose the Baha 5 Sound Processor.

Jamie G. uses the Baha System to help explore her love of music.

Jamie G. uses the Baha System to help explore her love of music.

When I first got it, I made sure my settings were adjusted to my liking, and it took a few trips to the audiologist to get it just right. I love the ability to switch modes. When I listen or perform, I need my Baha 5 Sound Processor to adjust to the sound of the music. The tones I want when I sing or listen to music are certainly different that my daily mode.

I use my Cochlear True Wireless Mini Microphone every time I perform with my monitor system. Using a Y-adapter plugged into the monitor, I plug in my Mini Mic to one jack, my in-ear headphones to the other. Once I pair my Mini Mic to my Baha 5 Sound Processor, I hear every tone of the piano, the full sound of the acoustic guitar, the intricate bass line, my vocals moving in progression with the band…all in stereo – in both ears!

My musicianship has improved and excelled in a way I only could dream of a few years ago. I can now lead musically, knowing exactly what needs to be done to move the band to a more unified and excellent sound.

Because of my increased musical abilities with the Baha 5 Sound Processor, I got to hit the studio for my very first recording a year after my implant. While using my Baha System, I recorded a CD with a full live band. It was a beautiful experience to see and hear my own songs come alive and to be able to hear them fully and in true form.

Hearing loss made me appreciate my gift of music through expression. But the Baha System has given me the gift to hear that expression fully.

I look forward to more recording sessions and producing many more songs that have yet to be written! To hear a sample of my music or to purchase a download of my CD, you can visit jamiegroshart.com.

The opinions expressed in this blog are my own views and not those of Cochlear.


 

If you are dealing with constant ear infections or a cholesteatoma impacting your hearing, click here to find a solution to help you get better hearing.


Want to share your story, hearing tips or Baha advice with The Baha Blog? Let us know! Find us on Twitter at @TheBahaBlog, on Facebook at our page The Baha Blog or via email at bahablog@cochlear.com.

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