World Health Day: Depression Tops List of Most Widespread Diseases

The latest estimates reveal that more than 300 million people worldwide suffer from depression, a figure that has increased by 18 percent from 2005 to 2015. Hearing loss is closely tied to depression, studies confirm.

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Today is the World Health Day, the high point in World Health Organization ‘s (WHO) year-long campaign “Depression: Let’s Talk”. Depression is a silent and hidden condition, that can affect anyone. The subtle signs of the disease can easily pass unnoticed, leading to low levels of recognition and access to treatment. In many cases, once the disorder is acknowledged, stigma can be so damaging that sufferers refuse to seek help. WHO warns that untreated depression results in a global economic loss of a trillion US dollars every year, and prompts international governments to allocate more funds to mental health.

Depression is a mental condition characterised by persistent sadness, critically reduced capacity to carry out daily activities, and a feeling of emptiness.

Hearing loss is connected to depression

Unsurprisingly, many studies have confirmed the link between hearing loss and depression. The percentage of depressed adults, particularly women, increases with the decline in hearing, from 5% in those without hearing problems to a staggering 11% in those with hearing impairment, according to a 2014 study published in JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery.

In many of our previous blog posts, the recipients of a bone conduction hearing implant mention social isolation as one of the tolls hearing loss took on them. Mona Andersson, the world’s first recipient of a bone conduction implant, recalls her mental discomfort as her hearing capacity declined in her teen years.

“I felt embarrassed and I would choose to hide myself”, says Mona in an interview with Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions.

Like depression, hearing loss is a silent condition that affects more than 360 million people worldwide – over 5% of the world’s population, warns WHO. Depression, social exclusion, and lower chances of employment are possible effects of disabling hearing loss.

Take the signs of hearing loss seriously

The US National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders recommends people who answer “yes” to more than two of the questions listed below to visit an audiologist.

  • Do you have a problem hearing over the telephone?
  • Do you have trouble following the conversation when two or more people are talking at the same time?
  • Do people complain that you turn the volume of the radio or television up too high?
  • Do you have to strain to understand conversation?
  • Do you have trouble hearing in a noisy background?
  • Do you find yourself asking people to repeat themselves?
  • Do many people you talk to seem to mumble or not speak clearly?
  • Do you misunderstand what others are saying and respond inappropriately?
  • Do you have trouble understanding the speech of women and children?
  • Do people get annoyed because you misunderstand what they say?

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